Home News Reports Survey says living in Bengaluru is cheaper than living in Karachi

Survey says living in Bengaluru is cheaper than living in Karachi

The Economist Intelligence Unit conducted a study, reporting the Worldwide Cost of Living as of 2018. The aim of the study was to understand which respective cities involved the most and least amount of investment and/or spending for both businesses and individuals.

How Was the Study Conducted?

The survey compared the prices of 160 goods and services in 133 cities around the world. Human resources managers then had to calculate compensation packages for overseas postings and conclude the placement of these various 133 cities accordingly. Therefore, the findings of the study can be regarded as fairly reputable and representative of the population in the different cities.

- Advertisement - - Article resumes -

What Were the Findings? What Does It Mean to us?

The results suggested that this was a “year of currency fluctuations”, which explained why there were so many changes in the rankings. The report further observed that there were “changes at the bottom”. “Within Asia, the best value for money has traditionally been offered by South Asian cities, particularly those in India and Pakistan”, it says. Therefore, unlike other countries at the bottom of the list, the presence of Indian cities and Karachi are shown to be quite expected.

The report claims, “To an extent, this remains true, and Bangalore, Chennai, Karachi and New Delhi feature among the ten cheapest locations surveyed. India is tipped for rapid economic expansion, but in per head terms wage and spending growth will remain low”. And they argue the reason for that to be “High-income inequality” in India.

“This, combined with a cheap and plentiful supply of goods into cities from rural producers with short supply chains as well as government subsidies on some products, has kept prices down, especially by Western standards”. The reference to a “short supply chain”, essentially indicates that there are fewer middlemen for the consumer to access a product. As a result, the price reduces to a large extent.

While referring to the cheapest cities in the world, the same intelligence unit says the cities are “cheap but not always cheerful”. The main emphasis on ‘not being cheerful’ is placed on the Syrian and Venezuelan capitals, “Damascus and Caracas show, a growing number of locations are becoming cheaper because of the impact of political or economic disruption”.

However, India still remains well in the picture. The report states, “instability is becoming an increasingly prominent factor in the Indian subcontinent in lowering the relative cost of living”. They thus conclude that there is a “considerable element of risk in the cheapest cities”: three of which are India’s in the top 10.

The EIU seems to believe that while Lagos, Karachi, Algiers and Almaty have faced socio-economic, political, security and infrastructural issues in the past, India’s main issue seems to be the “high-income inequality” and “instability”. They also say that ‘Cheaper cities tend to be less liveable’.

When three of our most popular cities, including our national capital, is the “cheapest cities in the world”, it is apparent that a sense of being less “liveable” is reflected by the study. At least in theory.

Sharing is caring - Share This Post and Support:
We need your support to survive in the media industry. Please consider paying us for the content we produce:

To know more about these payments, please click here.


Most read articles recently

Two AAP MLAs lunged towards Kejriwal and one punched him such that his glasses fell off, claims Kapil Mishra

AAP MLAs reportedly beat up Kejriwal so much that he has injured his knees and could not walk properly
Sri Lanka attacks

Sri Lankan millionaire’s family was an ISIS cell: Suicide bombers shatter shameless excuses peddled by ‘liberals’ to justify Islamic terrorism

All over the world, the terrorist attacks by radical Islamists is immediately served with long and extensive excuses about how social ills, discrimination, poverty, hardships, and atrocities lead to terrorism.
If you believe Google trends, this election is a runaway win for Modi

If you believe Google trends, this election is a runaway win for Modi

It’s fairly clear: Congress hasn’t managed to get its message out.  If you ask Google Trends, this election is over. The writing is on the wall. PM Narendra Modi is all set to win

Meet the Photoshop artist whose work Akshay Kumar showed to Prime Minister Modi

While mostly people have been appreciative of his artwork, suspended bureaucrat Ashish Joshi has threatened him with police complaint about his cleverly Photoshopped image

Air Vistara senior officials visit Gen GD Bakshi, apologise for deleting the tweet honouring him

Sanjiv Kapoor, Chief Strategy & Commercial Officer, and Deepa Chadha, Senior Vice President – Human Resources & Corporate Affairs or Air Vistara visited Maj. Gen. Bakshi and tendered an official apology

AltNews co-founder caught shielding Islamists following the Sri Lanka terror attacks

Altnews cofounder seems to have graduated from sharing fake news himself to shielding radical Islamists

Propagandist Dhruv Rathee mocks Manohar Parrikar’s death to score political brownie points

Earlier, too, Rathee was caught speaking the same language as that of Pulwama attack terrorist by mocking 'cow urine drinkers'
The Quint lies, twists and tortures CVoter data to make it say that the Modi wave is over. Here is what the data actually says

The Quint lies, twists and tortures CVoter data to make it say that the Modi wave is over. Here is what the data actually says

Leftist portal The Quint published an article headlined "Modi wave over? Why pollsters are scaling down projections for BJP" based on CVoter data, where the data itself was twisted, selectively quoted and misrepresented

Cambridge University confirms that Rahul Gandhi did his M.Phil using the name Raul Vinci

Cambridge University confirms that Rahul Gandhi did his MPhil using the name Raul Vinci

‘For five seconds, I was shocked. I was very angry,’ Sumitra Mahajan on Rahul Gandhi’s infamous wink

"But when he returned to his seat, started speaking again and winked, I was very angry. I said this is not proper. Actually, the hugging was not proper either. But this was a step too much," Sumitra Mahajan said.

Latest articles

Connect with us

157,311FansLike
130,322FollowersFollow
54,833SubscribersSubscribe

Don't miss these

Sharing is caring - Share This Post and Support: