Monday, June 21, 2021
Home Government and Policy Gadkari has shown a mirror to We-the-Dodgers of traffic rules

Gadkari has shown a mirror to We-the-Dodgers of traffic rules

Good governance is one thing; populism is another. One leaves us with standardized conduct out on the streets; the other leaves us with chaos and anarchy.

A typical day when I hit roads in my car in the Capital. The roads themselves have three types of variations. One is in the neighbourhood which teems with shops, cows, pedestrians, vehicles of all shapes and sizes. Here you could find our Virat Kohlis and Saina Nahiwals of future under the benign doting glances of their parents on the balcony.  Schools-buses come every afternoon in the weekdays; alien cars make a stop in front of floors which rent young lives that celebrate weekends with booze, music and dance.  Navigation requires yogic-contortions. Baring smiles on ladies who occupy a patch of the lane for their daily round of gossip is a daily act. Here are no traffic lights.

Out of my sector are the big, bad roads. Traffic here is always slow, a bane of our municipal corporations who hadn’t accounted for a future of burgeoning cars, lakhs of flats and millions of residents. Now there is a scramble to collect the daily waste, roads dug to wire our homes with competing WiFis, multiple gaps in dividers for vehicles to switch over from left to right and vice-versa.  Not that it matters to we the citizens: We simply opt for the wrong side of traffic flow, braving ugly glances, gesticulating hands and showers of the curse. How does it matter when a second of time and an ounce of fuel has been successfully saved?

All this before you hit your first traffic lights of the day. They usually take-offs half a week. You can’t blame them either: We the traffic are colour-blind to their signals. It’s indiscreet to press on accelerators when it’s Green; It’s too idealistic to stop on Reds unless and until shrivelled beggars and their acrobat sons and daughters fulfil your idea of charity or desperate men with fake editions of Sidney Sheldon and Irving Stone in your face reflect your educated background.

The next hour is a tribute to your ever-growing vocabulary on abuses. English swear-words are too polite. They are no match to our Punjabi and Hindi lexicons. The worst ones are reserved for the two-wheelers who swarm around your vehicle; darting from left and write, brushing your bumpers, navigating a gap you thought didn’t exist between two cars. Invariably you are forced to move out of right-most lane where the slowest of the vehicle is lording over the lane meant for the fastest. There are three-wheelers who couldn’t care less if their iron frames scratch your newly-painted car or goods carriers who move slower than a bicycle and make your swerve wildly to the hail of abuses in the background.

The irony is, all of these troubles could actually be your work to the others. You too jump traffic lights; you too speak on your mobile as you drive; you too drive against the traffic once in a while and it’s been ages since you submitted your car for a pollution check. You too subdue the traffic police with your rank and position if a folded 100-rupee note isn’t a good-enough grease to his palms.

So you too are part of the problem. Other traffic violators have turned you into one. Or it could be you who has turned others into traffic violators. Daily we hit the roads, daily we come back cursing the jungle that is out there on the roads. We are not wrong too when we curse the rogue mobike-rider who you nearly killed or one who ran a scratch across the length of your car. You also swear at the governance which leaves huge potholes and unmanned traffic lights out there. Submerged roads could test out the lungs of your car; or worse you could have an idea how a submarine floats under the water.

So, on the terrifying jungle out there which could maim or kill you and your dear ones, all the stakeholders- people, traffic planners and regulators—are guilty. Planners don’t ha ave vision for future; Enforcers are corrupt and we the people have turned monsters on the road. Like millions of gods we have on different aspects of our lives, we need to invent a traffic Ganesha too for our wellbeing.

Let’s now view the new whip which has angered most in this country. Most of us are either dipping deep into our pockets or crowding the Pollution Control centres on gas stations. We find the measures too draconian what if our registration, insurance and pollution papers are not in order. We aren’t counting the benefits which discipline would bring on our roads and provides umbrella against pelting hefty medical bills.

At the outset, there is every reason to applaud the transport minister Nitin Gadkari. He has been vocal on the Motor Vehicles Amendment bill for more than two years. He spent months in consultations with the states before finalizing and winning the ascent from the Parliament. He has shown a bloody mindedness ignoring populism and discomfiture within his own ranks.

Three states go for elections in next three months and are all headed by BJP—Haryana, Maharashtra and Jharkhand. But for Haryana, the other two aren’t willing to face people’s wrath. Gujarat has brought down the fines by almost 90 per cent; Karnataka and Uttarakhand would implement the Act but reduce the fines to just a slap on the wrist. Assam, Uttar Pradesh and Tripura haven’t even implemented it.

Non-BJP states have only poured scorn on the new Motor Vehicles Act. Congress, which runs Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh and Punjab have put the new Act on hold. Rajasthan would implement it but the fines would be reduced to a minimum.

There is no second-guessing the “non-BJP” states of West Bengal, Kerala and Odisha. West Bengal chief minister Mamata Banerjee is vocal that she wouldn’t implement the Act and burden her people. Kerala initially implemented the bill but now has put it on hold. The Odisha government of Naveen Patnaik has announced a three-month moratorium on the new Act. Interestingly, the Delhi government of Arvind Kejriwal is all in support of the Act.

It’s clear populism and politics would finally prevail over prudence. Our dharnas, noise and cribs matter to politicians. Asking us to wear seat belts, ride with helmets, follow zebra-crossing is too much of an ask. As it is to the tilted-heads on mobikes, using shoulders to attend calls on their mobile-phones.

Is this the entire truth? Doesn’t a couple with two small children, an old mobike and a few thousand rupees for a salary have a compulsion of their own on roads? Don’t we have faulty traffic signals? Don’t poor people buy a spluttering vehicle for a pittance only because it’s without papers? Don’t we have bus-stops right after the traffic-lights? Does the new Act take into account the last man on the road?

Good governance is one thing; populism is another. One leaves us with standardized conduct out on the streets; the other leaves us with chaos and anarchy. Good governance is never a zero-sum game: A few would always suffer in a society of extreme disparity. We have always longed for a government which governs for the good of the people. Now that we have it, we should strengthen and not weaken it.

  Support Us  

Whether NDTV or 'The Wire', they never have to worry about funds. In name of saving democracy, they get money from various sources. We need your support to fight them. Please contribute whatever you can afford

Ashish Shuklahttp://ashishshukla.net/
Author of "How United States Shot Humanity", Senior Journalist, TV Presenter

Related Articles

Trending now

George Soros-funded University awards former Kerala health Minister KK Shailaja for her ‘commitment to public health service’

Former Kerala Minister KK Shailaja, who was dropped from cabinet after lelection, awarded by George Soros-funded University

Gujarat: Cow smugglers kill VHP Gaurakshak Hardik Kansara, nephew of district BJP president, 10 arrested

Ten individuals have been arrested in Gujarat on accusations of murdering Gaurakshak Hardik Kansara in Valsad district.

Coronavirus: Liberal privilege that sank Kerala. Here is what went wrong

The media will choose to wait strategically till it reaches Gujarat, for more effect. And the third wave begins “officially” when the spread reaches Uttar Pradesh. And then, it will all be the fault of “Gaumutra.”

Taliban rule: When Hindus in Afghanistan were forced to carry yellow badges like Jews in Nazi Germany

In a bid to undo years of suffering and persecution, the Indian government had issued long-term visas to 700 Hindus and Sikhs from Afghanistan in July last year.

On World Refugee Day, read how Germany, Sweden, and India bore the brunt of incoming refugees

While the United Nations has been advocating the inclusion of refugees, the question remains whether the incoming migrants are willing to assimilate with the culture of the host nation.

Twitter rewards an Islamist org, set to be banned by India, with a verified blue tick: Here is what PFI has done in the...

It is worth mentioning that the radical Islamic organisation Popular Front of India has been accused of involving in perpetrating terrorist attacks in India and carrying large scale communal riots in different parts of the country.

Recently Popular

Republic TV issues statement over Arnab Goswami’s disappearance from the news network: Here is what they said

Arnab Goswami was last seen on May 2 during a discussion on West Bengal assembly polls. He will make a return on Monday.

OBC benefits for Muslims: How WB Police’s recruitment drive has exposed how parties found a way to make religious reservations

The drive was meant to fill vacancies in the OBC-A category in the state. The list showed that apart from one or two individuals, all of them were Muslims.

Who is Vishal Jood? An Indian national arrested for taking on Khalistani extremists in Australia

Vishal Jood, the 24 yar old from Haryana, has been languishing in a jail in the down in the country for two months now.

Kerala madarsa teacher preaches “kill the ones who leave Islam” while taking online lecture for class 12 students

Kerala madarsa teacher caught encouraging class 12 students to take to violence against those who quits Islam as religion.

TISS research paper calls Kashmir ‘India occupied’, blames Indian Army for domestic violence in Kashmiri society

A dissertation paper by a student at TISS-Hyderabad has come under the scanner for calling Kashmir "India occupied Kashmir".
- Advertisement -

 

Connect with us

255,564FansLike
554,933FollowersFollow
24,400SubscribersSubscribe